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More Than 300 New Species Discovered In The Philippines During California Academy Of Sciences Expedition
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More Than 300 New Species Discovered In The Philippines During California Academy Of Sciences Expedition

Scientists find additional evidence that the Philippines is one of the most species-rich places on the planet; provide recommendations for conservation. – California Academy of Sciences

The 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition is the largest expedition undertaken by the Academy. It was the first expedition that made a comprehensive survey of both terrestrial and marine diversity.

The nearly 2-month expedition which ended recently gave the academy botanists, entomologists and marine biologists a clear perspective and explored new life in shallow-water reefs, the deep sea, terrestrial and freshwater areas.

In a Press Release uploaded at California Academy of Sciences website; the scientists discovered more than 300 species that are likely new to science, including dozens of new insects and spiders, deep-sea armored corals, ornate sea pens, bizarre new sea urchins and sea stars, a shrimp-eating swell shark, and over 50 colorful new sea slugs.

Here are some pictures of the new species:

A new species of Nembrotha nudibranch (also known as sea slug) that was discovered during the California Academy of Sciences' 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. These brightly colored mollusks don't need shells for protection--instead they produce powerful toxins to keep potential predators at bay. Photo Credit: Terry Gosliner / California Academy of Sciences

A new species of swell shark from the deep sea. It can inflate its stomach with water to bulk up and scare off other predators. Photo Credit: Stephanie Stone / California Academy of Sciences

A new species of barnacle (bulge in the center of the photo) in the family Oxynaspididae living symbiotically on a black coral. Photo Credit: Terry Gosliner / California Academy of Sciences

A potential new species of the sea star Linckia from the shallow water. Its red color distinguishes it from other Linckia sea stars that are usually blue. Photo Credit: California Academy of Sciences

California Academy of Sciences biologist Gary Williams discovered this new species of soft coral while diving off the coast of Luzon Island in the Philippines during the museum's 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. The tree-like soft coral reaches heights of up to half a meter and extends all of its polyps at night to feed on plankton. Photo Credit: Gary Williams / California Academy of Sciences

A new species of Favorinus that feeds on the eggs of other nudibranchs. Photo Credit: California Academy of Sciences

 

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About The Author
Bon Francisco Talampas, Jr.
Bon Talampas, Jr. is a computer engineer, a former member of a technical team that supports a leading health care company. Prior to his stint abroad, he worked as an IT specialist and a university lecturer. Bon also holds an MBA. And aside from being a computer geek and DOTA fanatic, he spends most of his idle hours in blogging and photography. You can also read more about him at www.bonistation.com.
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